Photo 22 Jan 8 notes toomuchhorrorfiction:

Deathbird Stories by Harlan Ellison
Dell Books; Sep 1976
The one and only masterpiece.

toomuchhorrorfiction:

Deathbird Stories by Harlan Ellison

Dell Books; Sep 1976

The one and only masterpiece.

Photo 22 Jan 1 note Sorry I have not been updating much.
I found this tumblr to be a good source of horror fiction though if you want to fill your dash with more covers.
toomuchhorrorfiction.tumblr.com

Sorry I have not been updating much.

I found this tumblr to be a good source of horror fiction though if you want to fill your dash with more covers.

toomuchhorrorfiction.tumblr.com

Link 25 Oct 2,130 notes Neil Gaiman: Download a FREE unpublished Halloween scary short story written & read by me, and raise money for education and...»

neil-gaiman:

“What kind of story would you like me to tell you?”

I was on the phone on Friday afternoon, in the car on the way to the airport, with the folk from Audible.com. They had the idea of doing something really, really fun for Hallowe’en, as an All Hallows Read celebration, something from Audible…

You can log in with your amazon account so you dont have to create a new account.

Photo 20 Oct 3 notes The Fog (1975)
by James Herbert
[not at all related to the Carpenter film]

John Holman is a worker for the Department of the Environment investigating a Ministry of Defencebase in a small rural village. An unexpectedearthquake swallows his car releasing a fog that had been trapped underground for many years. An insane Holman is pulled up from the crack, a product of the deadly fog.
Soon the fog shifts and travels as though it has a mind of its own, turning those unfortunate enough to come across it into homicidal/suicidal maniacs who kill without remorse, and often worse. Even respectable figures such as teachers and priests engage in crimes such as minor public urination to as drastic as paedophilia.
Soon a bigger problem is discovered - the fog is multiplying in size and nothing seems to be able to stop it. - from wikipedia

The Fog (1975)

by James Herbert

[not at all related to the Carpenter film]

John Holman is a worker for the Department of the Environment investigating a Ministry of Defencebase in a small rural village. An unexpectedearthquake swallows his car releasing a fog that had been trapped underground for many years. An insane Holman is pulled up from the crack, a product of the deadly fog.

Soon the fog shifts and travels as though it has a mind of its own, turning those unfortunate enough to come across it into homicidal/suicidal maniacs who kill without remorse, and often worse. Even respectable figures such as teachers and priests engage in crimes such as minor public urination to as drastic as paedophilia.

Soon a bigger problem is discovered - the fog is multiplying in size and nothing seems to be able to stop it. - from wikipedia

Video 17 Oct 4 notes

Clive Barker or Grover, who did it better?

Photo 11 Oct 1 note Move Under Ground (2006)
by Nick Mamatas




The year is nineteen-sixty-something, and after endless millennia of watery sleep, the stars are finally right. Old R’lyeh rises out of the Pacific, ready to cast its damned shadow over the primitive human world. The first to see its peaks: an alcoholic, paranoid, and frightened Jack Kerouac, who had been drinking off a nervous breakdown up in Big Sur. Now Jack must get back on the road to find Neal Cassady, the holy fool whose rambling letters hint of a world brought to its knees in worship of the Elder God Cthulhu. Together with pistol-packin’ junkie William S. Burroughs, Jack and Neal make their way across the continent to face down the murderous Lovecraftian cult that has spread its darkness to the heart of the American Dream. But is Neal along for the ride to help save the world, or does he want to destroy it just so that he’ll have an ending for his book? -from Amazon.com







*I did not care for this book until around page 80 (of 160) and even then I was still a little cold on it. It attempts to imitate the beat writing style, which I do not care for in the first place, so if Kerouac meets Cthulhu sounds more like your cup of tea, the book is free from the author’s page.

Download pdf from author for free at moveunderground.org

Move Under Ground (2006)

by Nick Mamatas

The year is nineteen-sixty-something, and after endless millennia of watery sleep, the stars are finally right. Old R’lyeh rises out of the Pacific, ready to cast its damned shadow over the primitive human world. The first to see its peaks: an alcoholic, paranoid, and frightened Jack Kerouac, who had been drinking off a nervous breakdown up in Big Sur. Now Jack must get back on the road to find Neal Cassady, the holy fool whose rambling letters hint of a world brought to its knees in worship of the Elder God Cthulhu. Together with pistol-packin’ junkie William S. Burroughs, Jack and Neal make their way across the continent to face down the murderous Lovecraftian cult that has spread its darkness to the heart of the American Dream. But is Neal along for the ride to help save the world, or does he want to destroy it just so that he’ll have an ending for his book? -from Amazon.com
*I did not care for this book until around page 80 (of 160) and even then I was still a little cold on it. It attempts to imitate the beat writing style, which I do not care for in the first place, so if Kerouac meets Cthulhu sounds more like your cup of tea, the book is free from the author’s page.
Photo 7 Oct 2 notes Supernatural Noir (2011)
by Various

[A] masterful marriage of the darkness without and the darkness within. Supernatural Noir is an anthology of original tales of the dark fantastic from twenty modern masters of suspense, including Brian Evenson, Joe R. Lansdale, Caitlin R. Kiernan, Nick Mamatas, Gregory Frost, Jeffrey Ford, and many more. - from the Darkhorse website

Supernatural Noir (2011)

by Various

[A] masterful marriage of the darkness without and the darkness within. Supernatural Noir is an anthology of original tales of the dark fantastic from twenty modern masters of suspense, including Brian Evenson, Joe R. Lansdale, Caitlin R. Kiernan, Nick Mamatas, Gregory Frost, Jeffrey Ford, and many more. - from the Darkhorse website

Photo 12 Sep 4 notes The Graveyard Book by Neil Gaiman
My children’s recommendation for All Hallow’s Read.
Do you have a kids/YA recommendation for All Hallow’s Read?

The Graveyard Book by Neil Gaiman

My children’s recommendation for All Hallow’s Read.

Do you have a kids/YA recommendation for All Hallow’s Read?

Video 12 Sep 1,569 notes

neil-gaiman:

Is it too early to start spreading this around? I think not. It’s feeling autumnal…

Photo 20 Jan 13 notes Shadows Over Baker Street (2005)
by Various

Here’s a real treat for fans of Sherlock Holmes, H. P. Lovecraft, and  everyone in between: 20 original stories by writers of horror and  fantasy. Neil Gaiman is here, along with Barbara Hambly, Richard Lupoff,  Brian Stableford, Poppy Z. Brite, and many more. The premise is  engaging: What if the world of Holmes, the world’s most logical and  rational detective, intersected with the world of Lovecraft, where logic  and rationality have little meaning? These are stories about strange  beasts, men cursed to death, and the walking un-dead. Most feature a  powerful narrative voice. One stars Irene Adler and takes place nearly a  decade before the events recounted in the classic Conan Doyle story, “A  Scandal in Bohemia.” Another is narrated by H. G. Wells. Mycroft  Holmes, Sherlock’s brother, appears in one tale; still another has Dr.  Watson becoming Holmes’ client. The stories, set between 1881 and 1915,  are uniformly excellent, and the book, authorized by the Doyle estate,  is a welcome addition to the Holmes canon. David PittCopyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved

Shadows Over Baker Street (2005)

by Various

Here’s a real treat for fans of Sherlock Holmes, H. P. Lovecraft, and everyone in between: 20 original stories by writers of horror and fantasy. Neil Gaiman is here, along with Barbara Hambly, Richard Lupoff, Brian Stableford, Poppy Z. Brite, and many more. The premise is engaging: What if the world of Holmes, the world’s most logical and rational detective, intersected with the world of Lovecraft, where logic and rationality have little meaning? These are stories about strange beasts, men cursed to death, and the walking un-dead. Most feature a powerful narrative voice. One stars Irene Adler and takes place nearly a decade before the events recounted in the classic Conan Doyle story, “A Scandal in Bohemia.” Another is narrated by H. G. Wells. Mycroft Holmes, Sherlock’s brother, appears in one tale; still another has Dr. Watson becoming Holmes’ client. The stories, set between 1881 and 1915, are uniformly excellent, and the book, authorized by the Doyle estate, is a welcome addition to the Holmes canon. David Pitt
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved



Design crafted by Prashanth Kamalakanthan. Powered by Tumblr.